About Larnaca

About Larnaca

The town is lively and friendly. There is often music and live entertainment ‘along the prom’, and in the town centre just a couple of minutes stroll away.

Larnaca has a palm tree lined promenade (called Finikoudes) that has a lively and friendly atmosphere - especially at the weekend. There is often music and live entertainment ‘along the prom’ - and in the town centre just a couple of minutes stroll away, there is also plenty to see and experience - including local diving and visiting the Medieval Castle of Larnaka (also referred to as Larnaka Fort) at the end of the promenade.

Enjoying the Mediterranean

This lively and friendly town has a great choice of restaurants, bars and music venues lining the waterfront and at nearby Mackenzie Beach just the other side of the town - and a short walk along the promenade.

It has clean beaches surrounded by shallow blue water.

Just offshore, the M.S. Zenobia wreck is a popular dive site.

Larnaca Fort

The fort is believed to have been originally built during the Middle Ages, and took its present form during Ottoman rule. It was built to protect the harbour of the town.
After the end of the Ottoman era in Cyprus, the British converted the fort into a prison and it was used during the first years of their rule. The western chamber of the ground floor in the east was used for the execution of prisoners. The gallows, which must have been constructed in the room, were in use until 1948. It is open to the public.

St Lazarus Church

Nearby, and in the centre of the town surrounded by restaurants and public seating is St Lazarus Church, the magnificent early 10th century stone St Lazarus Church. It is one of the most important surviving Byzantine monuments of Cyprus built by Byzantine Emperor Leo VI in exchange for the transfer of the Saint’s relic to Constantinople. The church lies over the tomb of Agios Lazaros, the resurrected friend of Jesus Christ who came to ancient Kition in 33 AD and became its first Bishop and Patron Saint. It is said he was consecrated by St Peter and St Barnabas.The tomb, along with other marble sarcophagi and box - shaped tombs brought to light during excavations, can be seen inside the church crypt.

The brilliant byzantine artistry of the icons and the unique baroque woodcarving of the gold covered iconostasis were completed in 1782. It also has a graceful bell tower. The crypt, accessed by steps that descend from near the southern side of the apse, contains Lazarus' empty marble sarcophagus.

The Roman Aqueduct

Kamares Aqueduct, also known as the Bekir Pasha Aqueduct, is an aqueduct just outside Larnaca. Near the old road to Limassol, it was built in 1747.

The Salt Lake

The nearby large salt lake, that occupies both sides of the road on the short distance to the airport, fills up with thousands of bright pink migratory flamingoes in the winter months between late October/early November and March - and is delightful to view and photograph.

Approximately 6 square kilometres wide and sitting 3 metres below sea level, the salt lake was a source of commerce from ancient times. In a trade that was worth many thousands of pounds salt was exported from Larnaca to many different countries.

After the hot summer months, the salt lake is typically completely dry but it only takes a heavy rain shower or two to become a shallow lake once again. While the salt is no longer used commercially, the lake continues to play an important role as a resting place and winter home for migratory birds.

Click / tap an image below to zoom, and view as a slide–show.
The local Saturday market is always worth a visit!
The local Saturday market is always worth a visit!
Another view from one of the balconies at Flat 21
Another view from one of the balconies at Flat 21
St Lazarus Church in the town centre - credit: Wikipedia
St Lazarus Church in the town centre - credit: Wikipedia